International

East Meets West 2013 41" x 41"
East Meets West 2013
41″ x 41″
This quilt centers around a hand embroidered piece from India. The Amish style piecing surrounding the center complements the motifs in color and machine quilting.
Green Tara 201351" x 79"
Green Tara 2013
51″ x 79″
A preprinted bedspread from India is heavily machine quilted with microfil, beaded, enhanced with thread painting, trapunto and shiva oil sticks
Sewing Sister 2013 72 x 72 Sewing Sister was created for the Solar Sister exhibit under the auspices of Quilt for Change. When I first met Katherine Lucey, Executive Director of Solar Sister, she told me the story of Teddy the Tailor. Before she purchased a solar light, Teddy Namirembe would walk to the nearby village in Uganda to work at night, leaving her three daughters at home. The simple purchase of a solar light brought so many positive changes to her life and her business - she has extra time to work since she does not have to walk to the village and back and so her income has increased 30 percent. She is safer for not having to make the walk and her children are not alone at home. Her children also share in the use of the light to do their homework. She is not paying for renting a work space or for expensive kerosene and they no longer breathe in the kereosene smoke. Like most women, Teddy turns the extra money she makes (she sews school uniforms) back into her family and her business. As the owner of a small quilting business, I can relate to Teddy. I choose to work at home so I can be available to help my children with their homework and take care of my parents. The hours I have to work after dark, after the work of caring for my family is done, are vitally important to my business. Solar Sister is not only important to the entrepreneurs who sell the lights, but to many others who buy the solar lights and phone chargers as a part of their small business.
Sewing Sister 2013
72 x 72
Sewing Sister was created for the Solar Sister exhibit under the auspices of Quilt for Change. When I first met Katherine Lucey, Executive Director of Solar Sister, she told me the story of Teddy the Tailor. Before she purchased a solar light, Teddy Namirembe would walk to the nearby village in Uganda to work at night, leaving her three daughters at home. The simple purchase of a solar light brought so many positive changes to her life and her business – she has extra time to work since she does not have to walk to the village and back and so her income has increased 30 percent. She is safer for not having to make the walk and her children are not alone at home. Her children also share in the use of the light to do their homework. She is not paying for renting a work space or for expensive kerosene and they no longer breathe in the kereosene smoke. Like most women, Teddy turns the extra money she makes (she sews school uniforms) back into her family and her business. As the owner of a small quilting business, I can relate to Teddy. I choose to work at home so I can be available to help my children with their homework and take care of my parents. The hours I have to work after dark, after the work of caring for my family is done, are vitally important to my business. Solar Sister is not only important to the entrepreneurs who sell the lights, but to many others who buy the solar lights and phone chargers as a part of their small business.
Isolation 2011
Entry in the Quilt for Change (www.quiltforchange.org) quilt challenge exhibit “Women, Peace and Security” organized in conjunction with UNFPA (the United Nations Population Fund). Displayed at the United Nations in Geneva, Switzerland in March 2011 and at the UN in New York in March 2012, the Houston International Quilt Festival in November 2012 and with Mancuso Quilt Festivals in 2013.

 

Gifts A Mother Passes on to Her Child 2009
Challenge quilt entry for Quilt for Change exhibit in support of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. Exhibited at the United Nations in Geneva Switzerland in 2009, and at seven Mancuso Quilt Festivals across the U.S. in 2010 as well as at the MQX East show in Providence, RI in 2012.

 

Dragon Clan 2012
The center panel is an Indonesian batik and the surrounding fabric is an Alexander Henry fabric – a great combination.